Cranberry Sauce

As a kid, my parents served canned, jelled cranberry sauce every year for Thanksgiving. I liked the flavor of it, but the jelly part always seemed a little odd. It wasn’t until I became an adult that I realized you can make cranberry sauce, and it’s really easy. After cutting way down on my sugar intake, though, the standard recipe pairing a 12-oz bag of cranberries with a cup of sugar seemed a little too sweet. This year, I created this sweet-tart version for our holiday feast.

cranberry_sauceCranberry Sauce

3 cups whole cranberries (340 g)
1 qt orange juice

  1. Add cranberries and orange juice to a 2 qt pan and place over high heat
  2. Bring to a boil, reduce heat and simmer, stirring occasionally for until thickened (about 60 min)

Yield 2 c cranberry sauce

What is your favorite Thanksgiving dish?

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Unbelievable Chili

Today is the first day of fall. With the weather actually cooling down, I feel like I can use my oven and start making soups again! Chili has long been a family favorite, and one more dish I thought was gone forever once I found I couldn’t eat nightshades. For what is chili without tomatoes and peppers? Well, it’s pretty good, actually. Much to the surprise of my tasters (including me), this chili looks and tastes like, well, chili.

unbelievable_chiliUnbelievable Chili

1 lbs ground beef (450 g)
1 large onion, diced (140 g)
6 cloves garlic, minced (18 g)
2 T dried oregano leaves
1 T cumin
2 t ground coriander
2 t dried thyme leaves
1 t salt
½ t ground black pepper
pinch of ground cloves
1¾ c pureed pumpkin (425 g)
4 c Tomato-Free Tomato Sauce (click here for recipe)
2 c water

  1. Brown ground beef with onion and garlic
  2. Add spices and cook until onion is soft and translucent
  3. Stir in pumpkin, tomato-free sauce, and water
  4. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer until thickened

Yield 2 qts chili

NOTE:

  • This is a rather mild chili recipe. For a hotter blend, try adding small amounts of one or more other spicy ingredients (such as wasabi, horseradish, or ground mustard) to taste.
  • Several people have asked what looks like tomatoes in the bowl–it’s onions, colored red by the beets and cranberries in the tomato-free sauce!

What do you like to start cooking up in fall?

Tomato-Free Tomato Sauce

When I first gave up nightshades, I believed I would never be able to replace tomato-based sauces and I grieved deeply for my collection of Italian and Mexican recipes. After reading about the amazing tomato-free Nomato Sauce, I was inspired to try making my own version. It took many, many tries in the kitchen to get the flavors to blend well, but I finally found a combination of fruits and vegetables that really worked well. If you’ve seen my Cranberry-Beet Ketchup recipe, you already know that beets and cranberries stand in well for tomatoes. This sauce has a fuller body than the ketchup and makes a great base for my marinara, bolognese, and enchilada sauces. The next test: tomato soup!

Tomato-Free Tomato Saucetomato-free sauce

1 T olive oil
1 med onion, diced (110 g)
1 sm carrot, chopped (50 g)
1 med stalk celery, chopped (50 g)
2 sm fresh beets, chopped (170 g)
1½ c fresh or frozen cranberries (170 g)
1 t salt
4 c water, divided
  1. Heat oil in a large pot over medium heat
  2. Add onion, carrot, celery, and beets, and saute, stirring frequently, until onions are translucent
  3. Stir in cranberries and salt, cooking for an additional 60-90 seconds until fragrant
  4. Add 3 c water, bring to a boil, and reduce heat
  5. Simmer uncovered, stirring occasionally, until beets are softened and sauce begins to thicken (2-3 hours)
  6. Blend until smooth and add remaining 1 c water

Yield 1 qt sauce

Updated to add: Try out this recipe in my Unbelievable Chili (click here for recipe)!

Do you have a favorite red sauce?

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DISCLAIMER: This post may contain affiliate links. If you choose to purchase an item after clicking through one of my links, I may receive a small commission. Your cost remains the same. Thanks for supporting The Hyphenated Kitchen!

Beef and Cranberry Bowl

I recently started following The Autoimmune Protocol (AIP), which begins with the elimination of major inflammatory food categories, including nuts, seeds, legumes, eggs, nightshades, dairy, soy, and grains. If you are interested in learning the science behind the protocol, I highly recommend The Paleo Approach by Sarah Ballantyne. Since I’ve cooked dairy-, grain-, and nightshade-free meals for years, I have been surprised by what a transition this still is for me. Apparently I was eating more eggs, seeds, legumes, and nuts than I realized.

Breakfast on the AIP diet is particularly challenging with all the major American breakfast staples off the menu. I’ve mostly been stir-frying meat with fruits and vegetables or cooking a vegetable porridge. A week or so ago, I was inspired to create this dish after seeing a recipe for Corned Beef and Cranberry Hash. This has been one my most popular concoctions to date. The last time I made it, the kids requested I double the recipe and serve it for lunch, too!

Beef and Cranberry Bowlbeef and cranberry bowl

1 lb raw ground beef (454 g)
2 c shredded carrots (227 g)
1 c diced onions (160 g)
1 c chopped spinach (142 g)
2 garlic cloves, minced (6 g)
1 T dried parsley
1 t ground turmeric
1 t salt
½ t dried thyme leaves
¼ t ground cinnamon
¼ t ground cloves
2 c cranberries (227 g)
1 c beef or chicken stock

  1. Brown ground beef with carrots and onions
  2. Add spinach, garlic, and spices, and cook an additional 1-2 min until fragrant
  3. Stir in cranberries and stock
  4. Simmer, stirring occasionally, until cranberries have popped and stock has been absorbed (about 20 min)

Yield 5 1-cup bowls

What is your favorite breakfast food?

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DISCLAIMER: This post may contain affiliate links. If you choose to purchase an item after clicking through one of my links, I may receive a small commission. Your cost remains the same. Thanks for supporting The Hyphenated Kitchen!

Guacamole

I first discovered fresh guacamole when I was in college. It quickly became my go-to party dish. When I found out that I can’t tolerate nightshades, I thought perhaps my excellent guacamole days were over. I mean, I know you CAN make guacamole with just avocados and salt, but it’s really not the same. After some testing and tweaking, I finally have the proportions for my new recipe just right; I don’t even miss the tomatoes and peppers! I hope you like it as much as we do.

Guacamoleguacamole

Meat from 4 avocados, mashed (400 g)
1/3 c finely diced onion (60 g)
1 bunch cilantro (60 g)
2 cloves garlic, minced (6 g)
1 t lime juice
½ t salt

  1. Stir together all ingredients until well blended.
  2. Serve immediately or press cover directly on the surface of the dip to minimize browning.

Yield 2 cups

What do you like to dip in guacamole?

Midnight Chocolate Frosting

I suggested banana cake for breakfast the other morning, intending to make My Favorite Banana Bread in a round pan and call it “cake.” My daughter promptly informed me that what makes it cake is the frosting! I had to agree that cakes are truly cakier with frosting. So I let her whip up a batch of this wonderful fudgy frosting (that I’d put together to cover my Chocolate Birthday Cake) and the kids were very happy with their breakfast!

chocolate_cakeMidnight Chocolate Frosting

1 c coconut oil, melted
⅔ cocoa powder (53 g)
2 T honey (42 g)
1 T vanilla extract

  1. Stir together all ingredients
  2. Chill until set, but not hard (20-30 min in the fridge)
  3. Beat with electric mixer until fluffy

Yield about 2 c frosting (just right to frost one layer or 12 cupcakes)

This is a truly dark, bittersweet chocolate flavor. If you’re looking for something a bit sweeter, I have found it works well with 3 T honey. If you want something even sweeter, I recommend Elana’s Paleo Chocolate Frosting recipe which uses melted chocolate chunks.

Variation: This also makes a great chocolate peppermint frosting. Simply replace the vanilla with 1 t peppermint extract.

What’s your favorite way to eat chocolate frosting?

Chia Pudding

Once upon a time, my very favorite pudding was tapioca. I could finish an entire tub in one sitting. Recently, I’ve learned that even a little tapioca can cause me digestive trouble, so the amount in even one reasonable serving of pudding is enough to really bother me (not to mention what the excess sugar and dairy milk would do to my system). Although chia seed pudding is not new to me, I recently found a classic recipe from Elana Amsterdam using chia as a substitute for tapioca. I knew I had to try out this idea for myself.

chia_puddingChia Pudding

1 13.5-oz can coconut milk, blended smooth
3 T chia seeds (32 g)
2 t honey
2 t vanilla extract
⅛ t salt

  1. Stir together
  2. Refrigerate for 24 hours, shaking or stirring every few hours to redistribute seeds evenly
Yield 2 c pudding
What have you made (or wanted to make) with ch-ch-ch-chia seeds?