Avocado Oil Mayonnaise

When I started avoiding nightshades, I quickly discovered paprika in the most unexpected of places, like mayonnaise and mustard. While a few brands of mayo don’t contain paprika, limiting soy left me hard pressed to find a jar of mayonnaise at the store I could eat. I had heard of Primal Kitchen Mayo, made with avocado oil, but I couldn’t find it in my budget to spend $10 plus shipping for a cup and a half of mayonnaise! Now, avocado oil itself isn’t cheap, but it does cost only about half that to make at home, and as an added bonus, you can teach your kids about emulsions.

avocado_oil_mayonnaiseAvocado Oil Mayonnaise

1 egg yolk
2 t lemon juice
1 t cold water
¼ t salt
¼ t honey (optional, see notes)
⅞ c avocado oil

  1. Using an electric mixer or immersion blender (see notes), whip together egg yolk, lemon juice, water, salt, and honey, if using
  2. With beaters running, add oil in a thin stream, no wider than a pencil lead
  3. Use or refrigerate immediately

Yield 1 cup mayonnaise

NOTES

  • This recipe is sugar-free with the optional honey omitted.
  • I’ve had the most consistent results using either the regular blade or the whisk attachment for my immersion blender (both work equally well). I’ve also used a standard handheld mixer with either the whisk attachment or the regular beaters. The handheld mixer does not seem to get the mayonnaise quite as thick and creamy as the immersion blender. I have not had good luck using a standard blender.

What do you consider the best use for mayonnaise?

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Guacamole

I first discovered fresh guacamole when I was in college. It quickly became my go-to party dish. When I found out that I can’t tolerate nightshades, I thought perhaps my excellent guacamole days were over. I mean, I know you CAN make guacamole with just avocados and salt, but it’s really not the same. After some testing and tweaking, I finally have the proportions for my new recipe just right; I don’t even miss the tomatoes and peppers! I hope you like it as much as we do.

Guacamoleguacamole

Meat from 4 avocados, mashed (400 g)
1/3 c finely diced onion (60 g)
1 bunch cilantro (60 g)
2 cloves garlic, minced (6 g)
1 t lime juice
½ t salt

  1. Stir together all ingredients until well blended.
  2. Serve immediately or press cover directly on the surface of the dip to minimize browning.

Yield 2 cups

What do you like to dip in guacamole?

Unsweetened Apple Butter

A good friend has invited us over several times in the last month to help her harvest apples from the tree in her yard. Each visit, she sent us home with at least 10 lbs of apples. We all love apples, but after a couple of weeks my kids got a little tired of plain apples–even organic, fresh-from-the-tree fruit! I’m not a huge fan of applesauce, but I thought I’d try my hand at apple butter. I found an online tutorial at The Art of Homemaking, but it is sadly lacking in specifics, like how many apples, how much water, and exactly how long “many, many hours” might be. So, I started playing around on my own and found a recipe that works so well, my kids go at it with a spoon. My husband says it’s “tart” and an old friend to whom I’d gifted a jar described it as “almost savory,” but I just call it “delicious.”

unsweetened apple butterUnsweetened Apple Butter

3½ qt apples, cored and chopped (1.7 kg)
1 c water
1 T cinnamon
1 t nutmeg

  1. Cook over low heat in a covered pot, stirring occasionally until apples have begun to break down (approx. 30-45 min)
  2. Uncover and continue simmering on low, stirring frequently, until mixture is thick enough to stick to the spoon when turned upside down (approx. 1-2 hrs)
  3. Press through a sieve to remove skins
  4. Can for storage or keep in refrigerator

Yield: 3¼ c apple butter

Notes:

  • The apples weigh about 5 lbs whole
  • If you prefer your apple butter a bit sweeter, you can substitute apple juice for the water

I’ve enjoyed this on muffins and added to a ham wrap. To what would you most like to add a little apple flavor?

Strawberry Jam

Technically, this is a “strawberry spread” rather than a jam, as there is no added sugar. But we call it jam anyway. I first tried making a jelly-like substance after reading about recreating a PB&J burger at home on Clothes Make the Girl. It had never occurred to me that I could make PB&J without adding tons of sugar. From the first batch, my kids and I were hooked. Now when I make it, I have to hide the portion we don’t use right away in the back of the fridge or else I find small people hanging out in the kitchen eating it with a spoon!

strawberry_jamStrawberry Jam

2⅓ c fresh or frozen strawberries (340 g)
¼ c water

  1. Put berries and water in a small saucepan over low heat
  2. Stir occasionally until most of the liquid has evaporated and berries have broken down, about 45 min
  3. (optional) Blend until smooth

Yield: ¾ c jam

We like to use this jam for peanut butter sandwiches and to make strawberry cake. What do you like to do with your jam?